Tatung Einstein 256

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Van mars2000you

Enlighted (6260)

afbeelding van mars2000you

21-11-2012, 23:50

Historical conversion in US dollar :

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/data/EXUSUK.txt

So, in 1984, something between 330 and 380 US dollars.

Van jltursan

Prophet (2619)

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21-11-2012, 23:42

That info belongs to the TC-01. The Tatung Einstein was announced in September's 1986 PCW show.

The floppy, indeed, it's the same as the CPC, a cheaper unit than the TC-01 ones (no rubber belt, only mechanical drives)

About emulation, the TC256 is the more powerful machine from the list above and it has no decent emulation yet. Sord M5 has the better game catalog; but there're good emulators over there, The Memotech machines also lack a good emulation and they've a, maybe not better; but more original game catalog than the Einstein (a lot of cool platform games :-)).

Anyway I think that after all, machines like TC-01 and TC256 deserve a good emulator. I can only dream with the firsts developments for TC256 thanks to the help of emulation...Smile

EDIT: The price of a TC256 with colour monitor was 399GBP Running Naked in a Field of Flowers

Van mars2000you

Enlighted (6260)

afbeelding van mars2000you

21-11-2012, 23:50

Oops, I should have checked with the manual that indicates indeed "copyright Tatung (U.K.) Ltd. 1986"

400 pounds in 1986 = about 260 US dollars

Van MäSäXi

Paragon (1884)

afbeelding van MäSäXi

22-11-2012, 14:00

PingPong wrote:

The compatibility is the main reason of MSX2 partial fail. Software houses always targeted MSX1 sw because of larger audience. The result was low-spec-games. And a low spec game does not contribute to the popolarity of a system.

hit9918 wrote:

Commodore 128: There are NO C128 games! The C128 is the worst 128k fail ever with practically zero extra capabilities. Why doesn't one hear about this? The users were happy with the endless C64 games.

I was just going to write about Commodore´s 128K model. Smile First they made Commodore 16, gave it nice BASIC and lots of colours, but gave just couple of kilobytes RAM, took off hardware sprites and made it incompatible to Commodore 64, to prevent mighty good C64 sales decreasing, as otherwise many buyers had gone to buy better model which can run C64 games. Then 128K model era became, and Commodore took advice from flopped C16 and made C128 compatible to C64. What happened? Many buyers bought C128, but users just typed GO64 and happily played their C64 games and software developers probably saw that and kept producing C64 stuff. And rest of Commodore brand buyers kept buying C64 as always, as it was way cheaper and they had no use for C128 features.

hit9918 wrote:

But what would you say when you see in the shop a dirt cheap 64k MSX2 running badass games?

I would have been amazed! Big smile I just simply meant, that in the eighties I just couldn´t think that 64K machine´s successor could have been also 64K machine in the era of 128K machines. That would be commercial suicide. Maybe if there has been two models to choose, cheaper 64K low-end model MSX2 to use as a games computer to just play simpler MSX2 games and 128K model to play best MSX2 games and do anything you can imagine, maybe that could have worked, but 64K MSX2 without high-end model sounds like a trouble.

Van MäSäXi

Paragon (1884)

afbeelding van MäSäXi

22-11-2012, 14:13

When converting currencies, please keep in mind, that prices were different in different countries. In 1980s Finland, some computers were nearly two times more expensive than ones in U.K..

You cannot just convert, say 1985 currency A to 1985 currency B. You must also add the costs of importing machine from country A to country B. And then add some more cost to keep retailers happy. Maybe in some cases computer was first imported from country A to country B and the importer of your country imported it from country B. Maybe you also have to think of economy and politics of certain country from that particular year. It was not just 1980s thing that prices were different in different countries, I have read that even nowadays consoles are purposely sold in very different prices in different countries, and all that arranged by console manufacturer, so manufacturer can get more rich.

Van PingPong

Prophet (3898)

afbeelding van PingPong

22-11-2012, 20:33

MäSäXi wrote:

What happened? Many buyers bought C128, but users just typed GO64 and happily played their C64 games and software developers probably saw that and kept producing C64 stuff.

There is however a difference between C128->C64 and MSX2->MSX1
the C128 was meant as a work machine. The new hw does not have any improvement over the old for games.
On MSX, instead, the improvements were for work & games.

So i'm not surprised about the lack of C128 Games.....

Van Manuel

Ascended (18864)

afbeelding van Manuel

22-11-2012, 23:32

In 1986 an MSX2 with disk drive was about 2000 NLG, without disk drive about 1200. Check MSX Computer Magazine online for the reviews with prices.

Van hit9918

Prophet (2923)

afbeelding van hit9918

23-11-2012, 01:40

"that in the eighties I just couldn´t think that 64K machine´s successor could have been also 64K machine in the era of 128K machines"

@MäSäXi, ok I again made the error that I said some techie spec "64k", I meant a 192k machine Wink
Adding the 128k vram to the figure.
What I am trying to get at is that without cheap machines, you sell even less high end machines.

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